Remember me on this computer
4 canvases

Studio Logs

JP Delaney
4 canvases

During the summer, I had been complaining to a friend that the last work I sold was in 1986. This surprised her as she's always been enthusiastic about the stuff I do, and so suggested I send some paintings (within the month) to where she now lives in North America that she could try to sell. I eagerly went out to buy the best quality linen/cotton weave and stretched 4 new canvases. As I was working on the first, reality dawned when she then told me the project wouldn't work as (unfortunately) no-one was buying loser art. Taking the wind out of my sails, the canvases are still in the studio looking blankly at me.


You must login to comment or edit a STUDIO LOG project

Studio Logs

2012-01-28

It's been years since I last did a flat surface painting, as I've concentrated instead on 3 dimensional stuff that would then be coloured. This is the first attempt using one of the canvases. I'm not too happy about it as it seems like old work re-hash. All stringy and fecky (as they say here in Ireland) little bits. Still it seems to hold together in some sort of balance.
The photo isn't great either as I forgot my camera last time I was in Italy, but found an old phone with a broken screen with the camera still working. It'll have to do for the moment. Looks more or less representational despite being out of focus, however the ragged surface isn't really apparent in the image.

Comments

2012-01-28

2012-01-28

I figured I'd need to use bigger brushes to avoid that itsy-bitsy scratching surface of the first canvas.
To piss off all you fine delicate painterly types, I'm showing how I reconstitute all the hard dried-up oil paint, and mix it into whatever colour comes out of crunching up the lumps with a chisel, and adding oil and some paint to bind the lumps together. Without much ado, I use that to make a start on the second attempt. The bigger brushes cover more broad areas of the canvas, and the lumps give it an appealing diseased look. This'll go on for ages I bet, and will probably end up looking exactly like the painting that was done before it.

Comments
Hillel Kagan
2012-01-30 00:43

STOP RIGHT THERE! It's perfect just the way it is. Sorry for interfering with your process and it's not for me to say but leave it alone! By the way, I don't throw away paint either, I even use the remaining sludge at the bottom of my pot of brush cleaning thinners. Usually an interesting warmish grey.

JP Delaney
2012-01-30 19:32

You referring to the painting table or the painting? :)
You know well enough that it's only at the initial premise stage, and yet has to be dragged down into my own particular mire (as I've mentioned somewhere before), and hopefully one day drawn out exhausted the other side. I can't stop now. It would be just another nondescript element to toss onto the bad art mountain. Now if you were not such a gentleman, you'd say I end up making nondescript stuff anyway, so what's the deal? Well, the difference is the intent. The work has to be pushed through my slow and sloppy process in the hope it'll do something to expand on the boundaries of my limitations. There have been occasions (notably few) when I found a work already complete in the early days, and I can honestly say this ain't one of them. In this context, I'm not looking for a clean, fresh image, different from what I currently do - I'm looking for something that has honesty, something that I can still bear to look at years from now. It has to be "lived", even if it ends up like work that's come before it. That just means I failed in that case in my attempt to push the boundary. But I hope even that can be a statement. Failure is a constant in the process. It means I just have to get up and try and do it all over again.
I know you know exactly what I'm trying to say, Maestro Kagan.

As for the slimy gunk at the bottom of the thinners jar, I love that stuff. There's some of it on this canvas already.

Hillel Kagan
2012-01-30 21:09

Yer F**k'n-A right and I knew it already, I was just hoping the interference would cause you some discomfort. Of course I was talking about the painting. It's always nice at this stage when it's open, loosey goosey with potential for change before it closes down, becomes claustrophobic and threatens to suffocate you. The trick is to keep it open right to the end.
I love it when my wife comes into the studio and declares a painting finished when in my mind I've barely just started it. Naturally I'm still working on it a year later out of sheer spite but secretly trying to get it back to the point where it was when she initially told me to stop.

JP Delaney
2012-01-30 22:06

'Gobleshya' as they say here in Ireland, you never fail to make me laugh!


2012-12-27

2012-12-27

I'm back in the crumbling cottage in Ireland for a few days alone at the end of the year, and put the remaining 3 canvases together to continue with this after almost a year having passed since I last touched it. And so here it goes with the usual arbitrary slap dash applying of paint to fill the space, to get a feel of what I'm working with. I'll have a few days to work on it now. Let's see if I can make any progress in that short time. By that I suppose I mean I've opened with a lot of chaos, and can some meaningful order now be put on it. Meaningful being the operative word.

Comments

2012-12-29

2012-12-29

Oops a bit too dark this one. Never mind, you get the idea. It's not as if it's anywhere near a finished state so no need to get particular with image quality.
I was musing over what Hillel said about keeping the painting open as much as possible, and got me thinking about how precious I can become over areas of a painting that work well, and it's not until I sum up the courage to obliterate them that the work can move on. Even better is when you're so concentrated that you don't even notice you've painted over the 'good' area until later. That's always a relief. I imagine that my better works all tend to come together quickly towards the end, though months of running around in circles and idle navel gazing usually lead up to it.

Comments
shade faronbi

2012-12-31

2012-12-31

My photos are getting worse as I go along. Anyway for the record here's the state of it at the moment. I'm trying to follow Hillel's advice about keeping it open, not concentrating yet on any particular area.

Comments

2016-02-09

2016-02-09

I reckon I should post the latest ramblings with this... just for the record. Nothing much to say... just more of the same. It's another very erratic piece. There's still much to do before it can achieve some sort of unified statement. However I'll be able to dedicate some time to it now, and hopefully will be able to come up with some sort of solution in the (near) future.

Comments
Kristina Lycke
2016-02-10 10:15

Jp : Now, don’t disappoint us, we all count on you, this must be the “piece” (a little anxiety for you), let it spread joy on us all or tragedy on us all !


2016-04-27

Took this outside today and couldn't believe how amateurish it looks... depressing.

Comments
Gigi Dasovich
2016-04-28 06:09

hiya... Keep going. It wants more of you.

JP Delaney
2016-04-28 09:51

Thanks Gigi. You reckon it knows I'm just playing safe, and am most afraid of finding out I've nothing more to give? There be dragons.
I'm clinging to your exhortation as a desperately appreciated vote of confidence...

JP Delaney
2016-04-28 09:56

That doesn't read well... "as a much appreciated vote of confidence" would be closer - still with desperation on my part in the mix.

Kristina Lycke
2016-04-28 13:46

. . . there's too many people in there, you can't tell who's with who, no when and where . . . . . overcrowded !

Gigi Dasovich
2016-04-28 14:46

You might need a compass, a flying leap of faith, or, according to Moore: "To have real conversations with people may seem like such a simple, obvious suggestion, but it involves courage and risk".

Kristina Lycke
2016-04-28 15:40

Ciao Gigi: what do you mean? courage and risk?

Gigi Dasovich
2016-04-30 04:19

It's maybe using more of the same, and in so doing the honesty it seeks is hiding within or behind the process. Finding out that it's identity is lurking somewhere within a prescribed boundary turned comfort zones means that it will have to create a new route. It is resisting the prospect of having to create an alternate, unfamiliar path.

Kristina Lycke
2016-04-30 11:11

A little bit like forgetting?


Studio Logs